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The Daily Clipper 10/24/11

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Lawler's Law left an email this morning saying something about a "seminar". Yeah, right. He's putting up a brave front but we know the truth. He's a broken man, an emotional wreck, the lockout has left him a shadow of his former self. My heart goes out to him, but, come on, I mean, it's happening to all of us.  

I'm tired of reading about the lockout, and it's Monday, but I did find some interesting tidbits:

Mark Heisler: Crunch time has arrived in the NBA lockout - One great bit: "When Clippers owner Donald Sterling said at a league meeting that he'd fire Stern if it was up to him, it actually came at Stern's prompting, noticing Donald was stewing, realizing an outburst would scare owners back to David, as opposed to lining up behind Donald."

The Wall Street Journal - NBA Owners might be willing to sacrifice season
This isn't news of course, but the WSJ focuses on the owners, not the conflict.

NBA Teams That Can't Afford A Season-Long Lockout | ThePostGame - It's a slideshow. Fair Warning.

The B.S. Report - Nathan Hubbard - Bill Simmons interviews Ticketmaster CEO Nathan Hubbard. You need to listen to this. Hubbard is smart and in front of the curve. Good and relevant NBA content.

Deadline tight to finalize NBA global tour - NBA - Yahoo! Sports - Bleh. I've decided to ignore all of these "charity" games featuring NBA players. I know Michael Beasely sponsored one and he scored 55. Durant sponsored another and he had a triple double. Why don't I care?

 Must Balance N.B.A.’s Viability and Visibility - NYTimes.com - An interesting point of view from Rick Burton, a former commissioner of the National Basketball League of Austrailia. That's right, Australia. 

C. Rhoden: The NBA Lockout - NYTimes.com A video post suggesting the players join the Wall Street protest. Not sure what I think of this. 

Dan LeBatard: Lockout pits selfish owners against each other - I almost forgot this, Citizen teddygreen posted this the other day. It's a great analysis of Mickey Arison and Dan Gilbert. One has Lebron, one had Lebron and how they've switched places at the NBA dining table.