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Clippings: The all-time Clippers starting five

ESPN made its selections, but there is always room for debate.

San Antonio Spurs v Los Angeles Clippers Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

ESPN continued its deep dive into the NBA’s past on Thursday, releasing the all-time starting five for each franchise. Here is who they picked for the LA Clippers.

G: Chris Paul
F: Kawhi Leonard
F: Blake Griffin
F: Elton Brand
C: Bob McAdoo

Bob McAdoo is an obvious choice as the only player in franchise history to ever win MVP. He also won three consecutive scoring titles, is the only player in league history to ever average 30 points and 15 rebounds for a full season, and is the youngest player to record a 50-point, 20-rebound game. McAdoo had no trouble playing either big spot, and thus edges out DeAndre Jordan, Swen Nater, or Chris Kaman at center.

Power forward is the hardest call to make, and ESPN avoided making that decision altogether by picking both Blake Griffin and Elton Brand. If pressed, I might lean towards Brand because he was the best player on a playoff team, something Griffin never was thanks to Paul, but it is better to include both.

Chris Paul is another no-brainer. He is undoubtedly the greatest point guard in franchise history and ushered in the longest era of sustained success for the Clippers. Kawhi Leonard is a tougher call because he hasn’t even been with the team for a full season, but his performance this season eclipses that of almost anyone else to play for this organization.

The major gripe with this starting five is it isn’t really a cohesive lineup. There is no shooting guard, and Griffin and Brand don’t provide meaningful spacing. McAdoo had a decent jumper, but I still worry about how easily defensive could clog the paint against this group. Realistically, there aren’t any two-guards who deserve a spot, despite my personal affinity for Eric Piatkowski.

Ultimately, it is kind of cool to see the Clippers have so much high-level talent, all of whom hit their primes in Los Angeles, especially since there is a reasonable argument that this is Leonard’s best season of his career.

What do you think? Did ESPN get this right?

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